REVIEW: Ghost the Musical, Piccadilly Theatre

June 29, 2011

It’s been a long time since I saw a show I was genuinely, hyperventilatingly excited about, but Ghost was just that. The website I write for, The Public Reviews, gave its recent Manchester run five stars, and I’m a huge fan of both the 1990 movie and female lead Caissie Levy. The original score was written by former Eurythmic Dave Stewart, with Glen Ballard (who wrote and produced Alanis Morrisette’s Jagged Little Pill), so is naturally of quite a pop-rock persuasion.

Firstly, I’d say seating choices will alter your experience of Ghost. I was lucky enough to be a friend’s freebie plus one, so we were right on the edge of the stalls, quite close to the stage. Many of the brilliant supernatural illusions were ever so slightly more visible from this viewpoint. I’d really like to go again and sit higher or more centrally, but it was still spine-tingling.

In case you haven’t seen the movie (DO IT), the story begins with sickeningly content couple Molly (Caissie Levy) and Sam (Richard Fleeshman), an artist and a banker, who have just bought their first apartment and moved in. Sam is tragically killed not long after, and Molly is left with only the comfort of Sam’s best friend Carl (Andrew Langtree) – but there is more to his death than she knows. Sam’s spirit is left to put things right with only the help of quirky and fraudulent psychic Oda Mae Brown (Sharon D Clarke.)

Even though it is early days, it is hard to imagine a new cast succeeding the unbeatable combination of Fleeshman and Levy. His tall, Superman physique and her petite boho quality are perfectly matched, as are his soulful voice with her rock-tinged belt. In life, their chemistry sizzles; in death, their connection persists. Even without the careful and spectacular staging and excellent direction by Matthew Warchus, much of the magic of Ghost lies in this pairing.

Levy makes me realise what I look for in a leading lady – utter control, confidence and security in her voice and character. She makes her often wistful and lonely numbers unpredictable and haunting, but you always feel comfortable with her taking the stage. She makes a difficult character, one preoccupied with mourning, fascinating to watch. Fleeshman has the hard job of holding many of the scenes together while ‘invisible’ to 99% of the other characters. His scenes with Oda Mae in particular are a real highlight, and he shows off musical ability (strumming a guitar onstage), comedic talent and a silky vocal tone that is both distinctive and well-suited to the character.

This is an updated Molly and Sam; don’t expect a pixie-cropped Demi or a copper-Adonis Swayze, because this is a whole new Ghost. This works fine in my opinion, as it freshens the characters and you are drawn into a whole new love story, though much of Bruce Joel Rubin’s excellent screenplay remains as the dialogue.

Sharon D Clarke sets the stage on fire with her hilarious, warm, sparkling interpretation of Oda Mae, the unique character originated by Whoopi Goldberg. She avoids pitfall number one by steering clear of doing a Whoopi impression, and her added gospel and disco numbers showcase this woman’s astonishing voice and stage presence. Again, God help the actor who has to step into her shoes.

Andrew Langtree smarms and sweats as the couple’s friend Carl, managing to be both sinister and a man way out of his depth. His ‘New Yoyk’ accent was a little studied and made him more of a caricature than he needed to be, but overall he handled his scenes brilliantly – even as a fan of the movie, I felt like I didn’t know where we stood with him.

Overall this main cast of four are practically perfection – their voices, their chemistry, the slickness of their direction. In the scenes where Sam is talking ‘through’ Oda Mae, no one misses a beat. However, there is also an unaccountably large and awkward ensemble, who appear at intervals for largely pointless group numbers.

I don’t wish to criticise them as performers; I’m acutely aware of how hard a West End ensemble works and how grateful they often are to be part of a new show. I just feel they are badly used; something just didn’t work for me. At times, Caissie Levy is centre stage singing something heartfelt, and there are suit-clad businessmen and women dancing oddly in the background.

Much of their purpose, from what I can glean, is to diplay the fast-paced world of Wall Street and add to the street and subway scenes, but not a line of their songs was memorable, and Ashley Wallen‘s choreography felt clunky and ill-fitting with the simplicity and soul of the main plot.

One use was as a backing choir for Oda Mae in her uptempo number in Act Two, which was obviously needed, but other than that I’m afraid I would have sacked the lot of them and started from scratch as a smaller, more focused musical. I think there is enough of a spectacle with the supernatural effects, and enough lightness and humour in the Oda Mae storyline to get even the most X Factor-fed audience member through it unscathed. Some might disagree.

Sean Ebsworth Barnes

The only moment where their presence truly offended me, was after Sam’s incredibly acted and cleverly-conceived death. We are left grieving with Molly for approximately eight seconds before a tap-dancing ghost (with a host of bizarre, historically-costumed spirits) comes to sing to Sam all about death. The only word I have for this is ‘Why?’ The song wasn’t even good.

In terms of the main characters though, there was just the right balance of music and dialogue, you cared just enough about the couple and saw just enough of Oda Mae’s antics – the central plot of this show is beautifully balanced.

Rob Howell‘s design (with projection design by Jon Driscoll) is for the most part excellent. Most of the scenery turns into a video screen, which is best used in the subway scenes and with views of New York from Sam and Carl’s office. However, it is overused, seemingly to justify having it. This could be scaled down, as the moody, blue-tinged sadness of Molly’s apartment scenes are some of the simplest and best. Again, the structure and different panels of the screens were more clearly visible from the stalls, which may have made it less effective.

To go with this visual display, the sound was also very loud in the stalls (although a friend in the Circle tells me she found it almost inaudible from there at first) so the team are obviously still ironing out the creases in these previews. There is a moving section of the stage which is used to great effect, and the flexible, projected scenery mean we can move from red-brick Brooklyn to seedy Harlem in seconds, great  for those who dislike clunky scene changes.

The smoke and mirrors of the afterlife provide some of the best bits of the show; Paul Kieve‘s illusions are carefully and lovingly conceived, and none of the death scenes were cheesy or overplayed. The score is not memorable, sadly – it does however suit and showcase the lovely vocals of Levy and Fleeshman, and the restrained ratio of songs to dialogue improves it. Stewart produced Stevie Nicks’ latest album, and the country-rock quality of his songs really suits the actors’ vocal tones.

One of the most pleasant surprises was that the producers got the rights to Unchained Melody. I’m not a fan of the song, but  it was appropriately and charmingly used, rather than in a crowd-pleasing, 80s-nostalgia way. Like the casting, it refreshes a visually iconic story so familiar to so many of us. The romance and the resolution of this stunning show are truly raw and moving, and it will hopefully introduce a whole new generation to the magical, original story of Ghost.

 

Warning: this trailer shows you quite a lot of the show!

*The performance I saw was a preview, and some aspects of the production may change before the show opens on 19th July.

http://www.cheaptheatretickets.com/ghost-the-musical/

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4 Responses to “REVIEW: Ghost the Musical, Piccadilly Theatre”

  1. Stephen Says:

    I agree with the reviewer for the most part. I saw the show on Jun 28 and when I returned to my hotel immediately booked for the next night Jun 29.

    The performances by the four leads are exceptional. I loved the music…a good range o genres. Sound and lighting great. Illusions spectacular!

    I liked the use of the ensemble throughout… Other than “the New Ball of Wax” number after Sam dies. I think the show needs a number there but not this one…and get rid of those terrible ensemble costumes when we first met the ensemble ghosts.

    After some tweaking this will be a mega hit. Book now!!!

  2. Alfie Says:

    Great review, although I won’t watch the trailer as I’m too excited to go and see it for the second time in a week! All the cast were magnificent and I think the highlight – same as in the film – was the Unchained Melody – scene, so emotionally moving! Ghost the Musical is my favourite theatrical production this year, bar none.

  3. Tom Says:

    Really enjoyed seeing the matinee of Ghost today – it’s something I’ve been looking forward to for a while, as a fan of Levy and then from listening the cast recording online, and it really lived up to my expectations! I laughed, I cried and I was genuinely shocked and mystified by some of the illusions, particularly when Sam dies (at first I thought he hadn’t been shot and was still running… got very confused!).

    Completely agree with your views on Levy and Fleeshman – her vocals are stunning and she really brings the pain of loss to life. ‘With You’ in particular was a beautiful and haunting number that pulled at my heart strings. Richard really impressed me and naysayers shouldn’t use his soap background as any reason against the show. I thought his vocals were strong and impressive and his acting too – particularly the warm, friendly love between his character and Oda Mae towards the end of the show and the moment of shock when he discovers Carl’s betrayal.

    I wasn’t particularly impressed by Langtree; I thought he was very panto and obvious as the villain.

    Found the music a bit hit and miss. Some songs I absolutely loved, others I found myself drifting (particularly ‘I’m Outta Here’ where the ensemble were more captivating) but some of the numbers between Fleeshman, Levy and Langtree were great.

    Agree with your comments on the ensemble – in some places I felt they and their choreography fitted, such as the hustle and bustle of Wall Street and the model-like poses in ‘I’m Outta Here’ but other times I felt they weren’t needed, such as in ‘Nothing Stops Another Day’.

    Overall I’d definitely go again, left the theatre feeling buzzy and a little emotionally drained, although I question how long the show will survive without its two sizzling leads.


  4. [...] stuff like this is a great way to get attention. I haven’t been back to see Ghost since my visit in previews, but I hope to soon. A great day for musical geekery! Like this:LikeBe the first to like this post. [...]


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